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Home Blog Home   July 2009

Nursing remains a recession-resilient career

  Vanderbilt University study shows nursing demand remains high

Wednesday, July 08, 2009 at 4:24:00 PM


A recent Vanderbilt University study showed that nursing demand remains high, even in this difficult recession...

The study was performed by Dr. Peter Buerhaus, director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Health Workforce Studies in the Vanderbilt Institute for Medicine and Public Health.

Buerhaus and his team collected registered nurse workforce data from 2002 through 2007 showing increases of 228,986 full-time nurses in hospital settings and 136,779 in non-hospital settings during that time. Data from 2007 shows nurse wages decreased by 1.7 percent, which correlates to the economic slowdown that started in late 2007. With unemployment rates anticipated by many experts to increase by 8 to 9 percent by year’s end, nursing still emerges as a more resilient career compared to most others.

But more nurses are carrying larger responsibilities among their families because of the recession. “Seventy percent of nurses are married,” said Buerhaus. “This increases the pressure for RNs to work because they may very well be the sole breadwinner in the household.”

His previous research projected a nursing shortage of 800,000 to 1 million by 2020. However, based on current trends, the nation will have 285,000 empty nursing positions by 2020, growing to 500,000 by 2025. “Increasingly, the projected nursing shortage is viewed as much as a quality and safety problem as it is a workforce problem,” said Buerhaus. “There is no way possible that our health care system could function without a half million nurses.”

Enrollment demand at universities remains high as well..

Paddy ...

NOTE: Article text has been summarized. Click here for the entire post.

Nursing Graduates Finding Tougher Job Market

Monday, July 06, 2009 at 2:36:00 PM


New nursing school graduates are having an unusually tough time finding jobs after years of efforts to recruit people to the profession.

Experts continue to warn of a looming shortage of nurses in Iowa and across the nation. And some nursing schools are touting the profession as a safe alternative for workers who have been laid off from other careers.

But for the moment, at least, nursing jobs - like jobs in dozens of other fields - are relatively scarce...

From Des Moines Register: Nursing Graduates Finding Tougher Job Market

...Many hospitals have cut back on their hiring. Administrators say their finances are slipping, partly because recession-struck Iowans are delaying medical procedures, and because fewer patients have insurance to pay hospital bills. Also, experts say, fewer veteran nurses are retiring or cutting back on their hours....

...A recent national study found that the overall number of registered nurses has continued to increase during the recession, but that many veteran nurses either returned to the work force or delayed retirement because of the economy. The study, published in the journal Health Affairs, said the trends could give the appearance that the nurse shortage has disappeared in some areas of the country. But it warned that a shortage is likely to reappear and worsen in coming years.......

NOTE: Article text has been summarized. Click here for the entire post.

As people hit refresh button on their careers, nursing wins

Friday, July 03, 2009 at 12:30:00 AM


A recent article by the Cincinnati Business Courier discusses how more and more people are turning to nursing when they change careers. Are we surprised?

# Nursing as a career field is stabilizing as people return to the profession and others remain in their jobs longer.
# The Greater Cincinnati Health Council offers a refresher course for returning nurses.
# Many entering the field are in their 40s and 50s and want a more secure job.
# The market should open up once the economy turns around and older nurses retire.

From Cincinnati Business Courier:
Bringing Nurses Back

The U.S. Department of Labor's March 2008 Employment Situation Summary reports employment in the financial and credit markets has fallen by 116,000 since October 2006, construction has dropped 331,000 jobs since September 2006, and real estate has lost 34,000 jobs since June 2006. Health care, on the other hand, continues to grow, adding 360,000 jobs during the past 12 months.

The employment outlook continues to look bright for nurses. The Labor Department estimates employment of registered nurses will grow 23 percent from 2006 to 2016 and the country will need 500,000 new RNs by 2016.

From NurseZone:
Nursing Jobs Grow Despite Recesion...

NOTE: Article text has been summarized. Click here for the entire post.